Thursday 10th July 2014

Abortion is a gruesome and ugly business. Public opinion is moving in the direction of fewer and safer abortions.

In Abortion Free, Newman and Sullenger, founders of the prolife group Operation Rescue, share their more than fifty years combined experience in shuttering dirty, life-threatening clinics, including the story of how they peacefully shut down the clinic of Kansas’s notorious late-term abortionist George Tiller. In this practical manual you will learn how to (1) find out who the abortion doctors are in your community and if they have a record or are even licensed in your state, (2) get clinic workers to …more

The American family used to be the fundamental institution of our stable, liberty-loving, and very successful society. It is the essential building block of a free society with limited government. In the last hundred years, the American family has been attacked, debased, maligned, slandered, and vilified by every facet of society.

Who Killed the American Family explains how changes in the law, in court decisions, in the culture, in education, and in entertainment have eroded the once-precious institution. Any one of these factors would not have been enough to impact our families, but together they added up to a mighty force.

Veteran …more

Female powerhouses and original PolitiChicks Anne-Marie Murrell, Morgan Brittany, and Gina Loudon sound the clarion call for conservative women across America to reclaim the power of the grassroots activist by fundamentally transforming their lives and work in bold ways.

Women can be warriors without burning bras. Women can be strong without emasculating their husbands and sons. Women can be mothers without coddling or compromise. Most importantly, women can live out their faith without imposed compromise of her convictions.

What Women Really Want reveals the political conversions these three beautiful and passionate conservative dynamos. It explains the bad and the ugly of party …more

What the White House and Hillary Don’t Want You to Know

Bigger than Watergate! Bigger than Iran-Contra! “Ten times bigger” than both, said one congressman. The Bengahzi scandal may have been covered up by the White House, but the truth is about to come out.

The Real Benghazi Story is a ground-breaking investigative work that finally exposes some of the most significant issues related to the murderous September 11, 2012, attack—information with current national security implications.

Investigative journalist and New York Times best-selling author Aaron Klein provides the answers many have longed for from the secretive activities transpiring inside the doomed facility to shocking new details about the withholding of critical protection …more

What I Wish I Knew When My Children Were Young

Originally published in 1996, Child Training Tips by Reb Bradley is a classic parenting book that has withstood the test of time and is based on timeless principles: consistency, patience, and building lasting relationships with your children and is as crucial for today’s parents as ever.
Child Training Tips is not just another interpretation on how to train a child. This updated edition of the original classic is a diagnostic tool comprised of bulleted symptom lists to help parents quickly diagnose their children’s behavior issues and prescribe optimum solutions. It is an absolutely invaluable tool for helping parents identify their blind …more

Taking on the Party Bosses and Media Elite to Protect Our Faith and Freedom

In Firing Back, six-term Congressman Todd Akin describes in eye-opening detail what it is like to be an unapologetic conservative in a town dominated by media bullies, backroom bosses, and liberals of either party.
Although he tried to be a loyal Republican, Akin’s first allegiance was always to the Constitution and his conservative principles. When the Bush administration lobbied him to approve its progressive legislative initiatives, No Child Left Behind and the Medicare prescription drug benefit, Akin refused. In the process, he made some serious enemies. Those enemies got their revenge after Akin made an awkward comment about rape.
In Firing Back, …more

Stories of Growing Up, Meeting Famous People, and Annoying the Hell Out of Them

Nixon stood at the microphone and folded his hands in front of him; he moved them rarely from that position during his forty-five-minute speech. He spoke without notes on world affairs, traversing the globe mentally while discussing policy challenges that would confront the next president. . . .
Nixon’s impromptu speech showcased his great political and historical acumen. When he finished his talk and sat in his chair, a tremendous ovation filled the room. He stood and acknowledged the applause, and then answered written questions read to him by the emcee. Here he shined: during his formal speech, Nixon appeared somewhat rigid and tense; during the Q&A, Nixon smiled, looked relaxed, and handled each question deftly.
Although some queries touched on foreign policy, most focused on the upcoming election. Nixon felt the two presumptive nominees (Republican George Bush and Democrat Michael Dukakis) would run a close race, with Bush winning by a whisker. He refused to suggest who might be the strongest running mate for Bush, and named a list of the most oft-mentioned possibilities. Then, with a smile, Nixon pointed to the battery of television cameras in the rear of the ballroom: “To my friends in the media,” Nixon quipped, “if I forgot to mention someone, would you please list their names in your newspaper columns for me!” Even the reporters joined in the laughter.

How the World's Greatest "Turnaround" Nation Will Do It Again

When I travel to America now, speaking to groups across the country, I’m often asked, “What do you love about America?” And for a long time, a pithy answer was not possible. Until one day, it dawned on me.
I love America because it is confident, competitive, courageous, faithful, idealistic, innovative, inspirational, charitable, and optimistic. It is everything as a nation that I wish to be as a person.
And then there’s the other question I get: “What makes America exceptional?”
I’ll tell you; American exceptionalism is simple.
It’s individualism, not collectivism. Patriotism, not relativism. Optimism, not pessimism. Limited government, not nanny state. God, not government. Faith, not secularism. Life, not death. Equality of opportunity, not equality of outcome.

Was Albert Einstein an atheist? Many celebrity atheist websites claim Einstein as their own, but what did the genius scientist really believe?  In Einstein, God, and the Bible, international evangelist and best-selling author Ray Comfort explores the mysterious life of this great scientist. He uncovers information about Einstein’s home life, his rapid rise to superstardom in the science community, and the tension in his struggle to understand God and the universe. How did a German Jew rise almost overnight to international iconic status, at a time when the Western World considered every German to be the enemy? Why do so many atheists claim …more

A POW Wife's Story of the Battle Against a New Enemy

The plane was going down fast, out of control. Dark green jungle was rushing up to meet them. He ordered Kelly to punch out. He heard the thick Plexi-glass canopy above his head explode, and braced his body against the hard blast of wind surging into the cockpit as his navigator shot into space. He yanked on his own ejection seat lever and felt the hard jolt that meant he, too, had made it out of the flaming aircraft.
Relieved, he saw that he had a good chute. Floating slowly down through the hot humid air, he watched Kelly’s billowing parachute disappear into the tropical trees. He saw his A-6 hit the top of a mountain several miles away and explode into huge pillars of thick black smoke.
He landed in a tall banyan tree, his parachute snagged on a forked limb. Dangling in the air underneath the torn white nylon panels, he could see small figures heading for the foot of the mountain. He knew he had to scramble down and find a place to conceal himself, fast. Groping, he inched his way, hand over hand, up the twisting risers of this chute, trying to grab hold of the trunk of the swaying tree. Hanging on to the rough rope with one hand, he leaned his weight toward the tree trunk and felt the limb holding his parachute peel away. He fell, headlong, fifty feet or so, hitting the ground so hard he could hear the bones in his back crack.
He struggled to get his survival radio out of the zippered pocket of his olive-drab flight suit, hoping to make some kind of contact with Kelly.
“Kelly, do you read? Over.”
The black radio crackled with static, but Kelly didn’t answer. He tried again, and then again. Nothing.
Forty-five minutes went by before he heard the planes. Then he saw them, “friendlies.” They know where I am, he thought, relieved. I’ll be out of here by morning.
“I’m on the ground okay,” he said into his now-damp radio, willing one of the aircraft circling overhead to hear him.
“Roger, Red. See you in the morning.”
The raspy voice was familiar. Nick Carpenter, from his own squadron.
It would be a long night. No sensation in his feet and legs, he began to drag himself around on his belly, trying to find Kelly. He told himself it was useless, that Kelly had landed on the opposite side of the mountain. But he knew he had to keep looking. Finally, exhausted, he made a halfhearted attempt to sleep, one ear listening through the darkness, straining to decipher the strange jungle noises. He could hear the distant thrashing sound that had to be machetes, hacking away at the tangled vines.
At dawn, he heard muffled voices coming up the side of the mountain. He was sure they were enemy soldiers, making their way to his hiding place. He searched the empty sky for the rescue planes, the helicopters from Thailand, the Jolly Greens. They’re usually pretty reliable, he said to himself. Where are they this morning?
The sun was almost directly overhead when the strange-looking little militiamen burst through the dense green underbrush, AK-47s at the ready. They chattered excitedly about their prize, a downed American pilot, an American “war criminal.”
While one of the militiamen trained an AK-47 on him, another one clumsily fashioned a blindfold from a piece of brown ragged burlap, and the tallest of the four men tied it roughly and firmly around his throbbing head, obscuring his vision. He struggled to get to his feet, but two of the soldiers grabbed him and held him while the third one bound his feet with heavy hemp rope, which cut into the flesh just above the ankles. They drew his hands up behind his shoulders until he thought his arms would leave their sockets and then pulled the rough ropes taut, leaving his hands dangling just below his shoulder blades. They dragged his aching body through the underbrush and threw him into the back of a rusty, dilapidated truck. An overpowering smell of gasoline made him nauseous and he thought he was going to pass out.
He was probably on his way to the infamous Hoa Lo Prison in Hanoi, which he guessed would be about fifty miles away. Pilots had dubbed the old French prison that already held many of their fellow aviators the “Hanoi Hilton.”